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Researchers Identify More Proof That Dietary Patterns Link to CVD and Mortality

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Key Takeaways

  • Researchers identify 2 common dietary patterns associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality.
  • High intakes of chocolate and confectionary, butter, and low-fiber bread and low intakes of fresh fruit and vegetables was linked to a higher risk for CVD.
  • Higher intakes of sugar-sweetened beverages, fruit juice, and table sugar/preserves was linked to increased total CVD risk and all-cause mortality,

HealthDay News–In a study published in BMC Medicine, researchers identify 2 common dietary patterns associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality.

Min Gao, from the School of Public Health at the Peking University Health Science Centre in Beijing, and colleagues collected detailed dietary data using a 24-hour online dietary assessment for 116,806 individuals. Dietary patterns were derived and prospective associations with all-cause mortality and fatal and nonfatal CVD were evaluated.

The researchers identified 4245 cases of total CVD, 838 cases of fatal CVD, and 3629 cases of all-cause mortality during an average 4.9 years of follow-up. Sixty-three percent of variation in energy density, free sugars, saturated fat, and fiber intakes in total were due to 2 dietary patterns. High intakes of chocolate and confectionary, butter, and low-fiber bread and low intakes of fresh fruit and vegetables characterized the main dietary pattern. A positive linear association was identified between this dietary pattern and total CVD (hazard ratio [HR] per z-score, 1.07; HR for total CVD, 1.40; HR for all-cause mortality, 1.37 in the highest quintile). Higher intakes of sugar-sweetened beverages, fruit juice, and table sugar/preserves characterized a second dietary pattern. A nonlinear association was identified with total CVD risk and all-cause mortality, with elevated risk in the highest quintile (HR for total CVD, 1.14; HR for all-cause mortality, 1.11).

“The present study helps identify specific foods and beverages which are major contributors to unhealthy dietary patterns and provides evidence to underpin food-based dietary advice to reduce health risks,” the authors write.

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